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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
is at work. everybody is on this. in that kind of an environment with a large city like this, large police department, obviously the first responders on the scene are race volunteers, runners themselves, passersby. and emts. how does it work practically to have the foeb in charge? the n fbi is coordinating it. what does that mean when they're dealing with a large sort of resources. >> first of all, new in being a real attack is not new to the city of boston, the state of massachusetts and the federal authorities up there. back in 2011, just over two years ago, and previously before that the federal government in conjunction with boston did exercises exactly to prepare for situations like this. so what you have is the immediate response is always going to be governed by the boston police department and fire department. and then over team there will be a transition to the fbi. but most importantly, this has to be done hand in hand. the state, local and federal cooperation, this isn't honestly like the movies, where the fbi shows up and says we're in charge now. the relationship between the f
of the environment. >> trauma surgeon explaining that there have been doctors in surgery since early this morning. he's been in surgery since 8:00 this morning. he's performed several surgeries on the injured victims of today's bombings. the bombings took place at approximately 2:50 p.m. local time. the trauma surgeon reporting one of his medical partners here at massachusetts general has military experience and has served in both iraq and afghanistan. the doctor describing that experience, that wartime experience as being apparently very useful today. as doctors treated some of the more than 130 people who were injured. there are many, many unanswered questions tonight. including unconfirmed reports about other potentially explosive devices. found on or near the scene of the bombings today. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unexploded bombs for lack of a less specific but more politic term. as of tonight the official confirmation is that there were two devices. only two. those were the two that caused the massive explosions. to the extent that there were other device
-rich environment for the terrorists. we've been waiting for a long team for the next incident, and tragically it just happened today in boston. >> governor, what do you glean from the information that we do have at this hour? what do you glean from the fact there was about a 14-second interval before the second bomb went off? what do you glean from the fact that there were other devices that were, thankfully, found by the police department and they were able to detonate them? does it fit any one pattern of any group? i know it's speculation, but. >> sure. first of all, i want to compliment you, you said we have more questions than answers and i think that's important. we don't want to answer our own questions until we get more information. my view has changed just even in the past couple hours. we know it was a rudiment try, fundamental device. mark furman said you can probably make a similar device with ingredients from your own home. but at one time it was two devices and one two undetonated now there may be as many as five. then the question becomes is there one person involved? unlikely,
. in an odds, ironic way, you couldn't have had a better environment for a criminal investigation than yesterday. i mean, you had so much security on site, including the national guard, the joint terrorism tank force is on high alert for big events like this. i think they're going to crack this case pretty fast. >> you feel very comfortable that very soon we should have some information on who was behind this attack? >> i do. because it looks like an amateur job for one from what we know. >> it does? >> the early analysis of the bombs. these are not plastique explosives favored by professional terrorist groups you might say. also, you know, many of the things that civil libertarians complain about, the intrusive surveillance and monitoring of e-mail and phone traffic and so on, these are all in place. these are going to work much to the government's advantage in this particular incident. >> so very soon some information should be coming out. >> we don't like to same, you know -- but if ever the government was positioned to solve the case quickly, it's in boston where all the security a
something, say something. be aware of your environment. >> sounds like the best advice is don't let them affect your life, live your life? >> live your life. when you compromise how you live, that gives them a victory. as painful as it is today, you can't let them succeed, but us changing the norm, changing how we live. >> david kerley, abc news, washington. >> and a riveting picture from this day when we come back. i'm on expert on softball. and tea parties. i'll have more awkward conversations than i'm equipped for, because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. of mild to moderate alzheimer's disease is exelon patch. now with more treatment options, exelon patch may improve overall function and cognition. your loved one can get a free 30-day trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change
in a challenging economic environment. the question for all of us is how long willho that last that e consumers held up relatively well. i think we alsoly see that in spending and the credit risk -- or formants which have substantially come down verall, they're at close to historical lows. we're performing a50% better than the major bank card issuers. so i think that that demonstrates some view that the consumer health is pretty decent. consumer confidence held up pretty well. but, frankly, david, i've really been of the view not surprisingly that the economic recovery as i look at in the broad scale is going to be relatively slow. i don't have a great deal of confidence that there's going to be any turnaround in the near term. and i think what we've got to hope for is that it >> over the last, certainly over the last four years of this administration part of a long-term trend as i've outlined in the book is using more and more state power to impose a particular worldview called liberalism and i will go into a definition of that so we are not using terms loosely but as a christian i am worried
, right? the world trade center attacks. this area knows this environment, this modern terrorist really well.l. what is -- modern terrorism ter really well. what is going on in the markets transcend what's is going on globally for a couple of reasons. we've had this unprecedentedcede move to the outside. uncharted territory for the major averages. that has to cool off, right. china growth slowing and gold rocketing so much so soon for so long that things are starting to taper off a little bit. b that's what we saw yesterdayrday before the bombings which did intensify the fear out there. >> lauren thanks as always. see you tomorrow.tomo >> all right.>> a >> thank you very much. a powerful earthquake has hit h iran today. wisdom martin is back with more on the top stories makingng headlines this morning. good morning, wisdom.dom. >> good morning, tony. this say really bad situation. officials in iran say the number of dead could run into the hundreds. the earthquake struck near iran's border with pakistan andd so far at least 40 people aree dead. the 7.8 quake is the strongesttr to hit th
eliminate the other factors present in the environment. in fact, we wouldn't know with some certainty until the laboratory completes its final review. away from the scene yesterday afternoon, the jttf began its investigation. immediately after the bombing, the fbi initiated a command post. those assigned to the jttf intelligence analysts and other personnel from every state, local and federal government agency associated with jttf, and many others on their own's including boston pd and mass state police, more than a thousand law enforcement officers across many agencies have been assigned to this investigation via the command post. they began to canvass sources and conduct interviews with others to determine who was responsible for this crime. we are doing this methodically and carefully. all across the nation and around the world, the force of the united states is working hard to locate those responsible. already, the fbi has received more than 2,000 tips as of noon today, many of which have already been reviewed, analyzed and vetted. we will continue to work around the clock tirelessly si
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. , so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bondy, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the hairson family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious conc
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bonnie, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the harrison family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious co
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. is hot andtion bill heavy, front and center. ginsburg indid espagnole. shows, toe sunday talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. i think the guns may come out not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. states, nowunited japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance. into thebring nafta 21st century. much on thee very u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. the second reason this will be terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our great experts. ted. , weseries of speakers today will have first ambassador med
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)